Six Rivers National Forest Activates Phase 1 Fire Restrictions

Monday, July 25, 2022

Six Rivers National Forest Activates Phase 1 Fire Restrictions





Job




By Kimberly Porter
on Mon 25 Jul 2022 at 11:06



Phase 1 fire restrictions were activated today by Six Rivers National Forest due to ongoing drought and warming.

Under restrictions, campfires can still be lit in established fire pits”in designated serviced campgrounds and day-use sites only,” according to a press release, but are not permitted at all recreation sites in the forest.

“Six Rivers wants visitors to continue to enjoy our beautiful forest and explore the outdoors, we just need to make sure we take every precaution,” Forestry Supervisor Ted McArthur said. “We know how important and nostalgic campfires are, so we’re not completely restricting them yet, but we are mandating that campfires remain within designated fire rings in developed forest sites like campgrounds. We regularly have staff in these locations and these areas are free of debris and vegetation, reducing the chances of an escaped campfire becoming a wildfire.

The restrictions also prohibit: Smoking, except in an enclosed vehicle or building, designated campground or recreation area, or while stationary in an area at least three feet in diameter that is sterile or free of flammable materials and uoperate a motor vehicle off paved, gravel, or dirt National Forest System roads and trails, except in an area designated for off-road vehicles.

Read the statement from Six Rivers National Forest below:

Continued drought and warming conditions have prompted Six Rivers National Forest to institute Phase 1 fire restrictions effective today, July 25, 2022. Under these restrictions, the public may still build or maintaining a fire, campfire or charcoal briquette fire in established fire pits. only in designated serviced campgrounds and day use areas. However, campfires will not be permitted at all Six Rivers National Forest recreation sites.

“Six Rivers wants visitors to continue to enjoy our beautiful forest and explore the outdoors, we just need to make sure we take every precaution,” Forestry Supervisor Ted McArthur said. “We know how important and nostalgic campfires are, so we’re not completely restricting them yet, but we are mandating that campfires remain within designated fire rings in developed forest sites like campgrounds. We regularly have staff in these locations and these areas are free of debris and vegetation, reducing the chances of an escaped campfire becoming a wildfire.

Fire management officials monitor fire conditions in the forest year-round. The decision to switch to fire restrictions is based on fuel moisture levels and expected weather conditions. This helps officials determine when to start, increase and cancel fire restrictions. Fire restriction rules may vary throughout the year. Currently, Six Rivers National Forest is under Tier 1 restrictions.

Stage 1 means that the following are prohibited:

  • Build or maintain a fire, campfire or charcoal briquette fire outside established fire pits in designated designated campgrounds and picnic areas.
  • Smoking, except in an enclosed vehicle or building, designated campground or recreation area, or while stationary in an area at least three feet in diameter that is sterile or free of flammable materials.
  • Operation of a motor vehicle off paved, gravel, or dirt National Forest System roads and trails, except in an area designated for off-road vehicles.


Regardless of the conditions and time of year, we must always remain vigilant to avoid human-caused wildfires. Help protect our forests, our firefighters and our communities by following these principles when on woodlands:

  • Campfires: Always watch your campfire.
  • Make sure your fire is completely out: drown it with water (NOT dirt), stir with your shovel, drown again, and feel any heat with the back of your hand. Continue this process until no more heat remains.
  • Stoves: If using pressurized or bottled liquid fuel stoves, lanterns, or heaters, use them in arid areas with at least 3 feet of clearance from grasses and other debris that can catch fire. Prevent pans from tipping over.
  • Vehicles: When traveling, make sure your channels are properly connected. The hot underside of the vehicle and dragging chains can start a fire. Stick to driving on designated roads and trails, and be careful not to park your car or OHV in tall, dry vegetation, including grass.
  • Spark Arrester: Ensure that all internal or external combustion engines are equipped with a properly installed, maintained, and operating spark arrester.
  • Flammable objects: Fireworks are prohibited on all state forests all year round, leave them and all other pyrotechnic devices at home.
  • Always be careful when smoking. Extinguish all dead smoking material on the bare floor. Pack all cigarette butts and filters.

To view a list of all designated serviced recreation sites, visit Recreation Sites (fs.fed.us) or click here.

Tags: Six Rivers National Forest, Stage 1 fire restriction, drought, warming conditions, wildfires, Image